Is access to a good coffee all we care about?

Now, I’ll state at the outset that I am a big fan of the design of the New York High Line.  And I love a good flat white.  I’m also prone to a bit of retail therapy now and then as well.  The High Line has enabled the regeneration of a disused asset as well as the gentrification of the streets and area below it.

It is lauded as one of the world’s best examples  of adaptive reuse of abandoned infrastructure.

However this is an alternative view of how some projects are funded, and at what cost to a city.

It is recommended reading to form your own view…it does raise a few questions in regards to equality?

http://www.thepolisblog.org/2013/02/poverty-high-line.html

What happens underneath?Image: Iwan Baan

What happens underneath?
Image: Iwan Baan

Are the areas underneath the High Line becoming too gentrified, and at what expense?Image: Iwan Baan

Are the areas underneath the High Line becoming too gentrified, and at what expense?
Image: Iwan Baan

Beyond iconic architecture

Beyond iconic architecture.

‘We all realize that a “sense of place” is of fundamental value to people everywhere — in every city, every town, every neighborhood, and every culture, for all ages.

At least, that is what the average person recognizes instinctively. It is a fundamental reality that all too often is missing from the discussion when it comes to architecture and design’

Angus Bruce

All aboard: the growth of global rail and our future cities

http://theconversation.edu.au/all-aboard-the-growth-of-global-rail-and-our-future-cities-10377?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest+from+The+Conversation+for+5+December+2012&utm_content=Latest+from+The+Conversation+for+5+December+2012+CID_9db47f1a5ad835b955f0ddccddfb2372&utm_source=campaign_monitor&utm_term=All%20aboard%20the%20growth%20of%20global%20rail%20and%20our%20future%20cities

Article by Peter Newman, Garry Glazebrook and Jeff Kenworthy of light and heavy rail growth